To stop the spread of illness, students and staff must stay home if they are feeling sick.

Multilingual COVID-19 Information 

Frequently Asked Questions on COVID-19

What can parents and guardians do the minimize or mitigate the risk of viral infections, especially COVID-19?

Do a wellness check on your child each morning at home to determine if your child

should attend school.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If any of these symptoms are present, your child should not attend school. If your child is suspected of being sick, you will be contacted, and you will be asked to pick up your child.

Ensure your child arrives at school wearing a face covering and ideally has an extra

one on hand.

Follow school policies on drop off and pick up and recognize that parent/legal

guardian access to the building will be strictly limited.

Be sure the school has updated contact information in the event that your child

needs to be sent home.

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What are the recommended practices for hand washing, sanitizing, and personal hygiene?
Frequent Hand Washing and/or Sanitizing.

  • All students and staff must engage in frequent hand washing or sanitizing, including upon arrival, before and after meals, after bathroom use, after coughing or sneezing, in between classes, and before dismissal.
     

  • Hand washing must be conducted with soap and water for at least 20 seconds and hand sanitizer must contain at least 60% alcohol.
     

  • Hand washing or sanitizing stations must be available at the entrance of school, near or inside of classrooms, and in all meeting areas (e.g. library, dining hall, offices). Ilima has sanitizing stations near the bus gate, cafeteria entrances, Media Center, and the office. Each classroom has a bottle of hand sanitizer.
     

  • Restrooms, sinks, and sanitizing stations must be regularly maintained with adequate supplies (i.e. soap, sanitizer, and paper towels).

Promote and Practice Personal Hygiene

  • Do not touch your eyes, nose, or mouth.
     

  • Sneeze or cough into a tissue and throw it away. If no tissue is available, reduce the spread of germs by coughing or sneezing into your elbow.
     

  • As part of health education, deliver lessons to develop student skills related to personal hygiene.

What is the guidance on face covering or mask?

  • Face coverings for adults and students must be worn when outside the classroom (e.g.,moving from class to class, to an office, the library, or locker room) especially when physical distancing is difficult.
     

  • To the extent possible, all adults should wear a mask while at school. When within 3 feet or a student or other staff member, adults must wear a mask.
     

  • Exceptions for face coverings/masks apply to those for whom it is not safe to do so due to age, medical condition, or other considerations.
     

  • Masks should be worn when keeping 6 feet apart is not possible, or when children face each other and interact in similar ways. 
     

  • Secondary students shall wear masks when they are closer than 6 feet apart from each other.

    • In school models where students transition from class to class, masks shall be worn during the transition. 
       

  • When students are not wearing a mask, they should avoid close proximity (minimum 3 feet apart without facing each other) during group activities such as choir, band and exercising (physical education).
     

  • Wearing a face shield is not necessary for an adult unless working in a special setting such as the health room (receiving students who are sick) or interacting with students who have special needs or disabilities, where there is a higher risk of coming into contact with body fluids or respiratory droplets.
     

  • Staff are responsible to bring and properly maintain their own masks.
     

  • Parents/legal guardians will be responsible for providing students with face coverings or masks.
     

  • Schools shall have backup disposable masks available for staff and students who need them.

What can school staff do to protect themselves and others from getting sick with COVID-19?

School staff can take everyday preventive actions to protect themselves and others from getting sick with COVID-19:

  • Washing hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub them together until they feel dry.

  • Covering coughs and sneezes with a tissue or inside of elbow, throwing the tissue away, and then washing hands.

  • Avoiding touching one’s eyes, nose, mouth, and cloth face covering.

  • Maintaining distance of at least 6 feet from other adults, and from students when feasible.

  • Wearing a cloth face covering especially when other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain.

  • Cleaning and disinfecting frequently touched surfaces, including tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones, keyboards, toilets, faucets, and sinks.

  • Staying home when sick, or after being in close contact with a person with COVID-19.

  • Limiting use of shared objects (e.g., gym or physical education equipment, art supplies, games) when possible, and cleaning and disinfecting these objects frequently.

What happens when a student becomes sick?

  • When a student becomes sick at school, send the student to the Health Room.
     

  • The School Health Assistant (SHA) will call the student’s parent/legal guardian to pick up the student.

❖ While waiting to be picked up, sick students are isolated from those who are well. If possible, in a supervised area outside the health room.
 

❖ The student waits in another section of the health room or supervised away from the main office or any other high traffic area(s).
 

❖ If a student is experiencing symptoms of respiratory illness or influenza, he/she should take the following precautions:

➢ Isolation and exclusion from school should be continued for 7 days after illness onset or until 24 hours after the resolution of fever and respiratory symptoms, whichever is longer.
 

❖ If a student is sent home due to any illness symptom other than a respiratory illness or influenza, he/she should be excluded from school until symptom-free for at least 24 hours without the use of medication.
 

❖ The SHA will send a note home with the student which conveys the recommendations above.
 

❖ For a student who has tested positive for COVID-19, the DOH will determine the dates of quarantine and will guide the student as to his/her subsequent care and return to school.

What are the rules for visitors?

  • ʻIlima Intermediate will be restricting access to the campus if a visitor is exhibiting symptoms of illness. All visitors must report to the front office following the social distancing signs and markers.  
     

  • To ensure the health and safety of our campus, the following visitor safeguards are in place:

    • Visitors must call to schedule an appointment with our front office staff prior to arriving on campus. Call the school office at (808) 687-9300 to make arrangements.
       

  • Scheduled visitors will wear a face mask while conducting business on campus.
     

  • Administrators shall have the authority to restrict access to the campus for those individuals exhibiting any symptoms of illness.
     

  • Administrators shall have the authority to restrict access to the campus if a visitor doesn’t have an appointment.  Administrator will allow for scheduling a future appointment or other means of communication
     

  • Persons who are restricted from physical presence at the school or office shall be allowed to conduct business by telephone or other appropriate audio-visual technology.

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State of Hawaii Department of Health Webinar

Key Talking Points
5:20 - What are “Safe Practices”

6:25 - What does that mean for our kids? 

8:30 - Safety for younger kids

10:00 - Masking outside of the classroom

12:45 - Risk of Infection (Why we need to protect our kids)

13:50 - Student Waiting Areas | Questions: How formal and specific should the waiting areas should be if a student shows symptoms or get sick? 

16:45 - 3ft vs 6ft physical distancing and wearing a mask inside a classroom

19:00 - 3ft vs 6ft: Secondary students (Middle and high school) 

19:50 - School bus (Wearing a mask) 

21:00 - DOE Handbook Reopening (A note from superintendent) 

21:45 - What is the role of the DOH when there is a suspected case? What happens when that case becomes a cluster?

22:50 - Hypothetical scenario: A positive case (student) 

26:25 - Random testing from the DOH of educators? Is there any value

28:00 - 3ft vs 6ft physical distancing and wearing a mask inside a classroom (pt 2)

— Q & A Portion — 

30:20 - Will there be a hotline?

32:45 - Tips for after school (Maintaining that bubble) 

33:30 - Tips for after school (Secondary Ed students) 

34:30 - Face Shields vs Masks

36:00 - Parents picking up dropping off (Wearing a mask)

36:45 - Temperature checks for students, advocation for health checks (symptoms)

39:15 - Written guidance

40:00 - Students eating in classrooms vs the cafeteria (Physical Distancing)

42:00 - Should students wear a face shield during recess when play space is limited?

43:45 - Will there be DOH guidance and training for all schools regarding school opening?

45:20 - Will there be DOH guidance for isolation areas, do these areas need to be staffed by a nurse?

46:35 - Are oscillating fans ok in the classroom?

48:22 - Water fountain usage

52:40 - Mention of DOE Return to learn guidance PDF by superintendent, will address food service and transportation

54:40 - Should parents be allowed on campus to pick up and drop off students? 

56:00 - Covid testing (Specifically Mainland teachers) 

Key Talking Points
5:20 - What are “Safe Practices”

6:25 - What does that mean for our kids? 

8:30 - Safety for younger kids

10:00 - Masking outside of the classroom

12:45 - Risk of Infection (Why we need to protect our kids)

13:50 - Student Waiting Areas | Questions: How formal and specific should the waiting areas should be if a student shows symptoms or get sick? 

16:45 - 3ft vs 6ft physical distancing and wearing a mask inside a classroom

19:00 - 3ft vs 6ft: Secondary students (Middle and high school) 

19:50 - School bus (Wearing a mask) 

21:00 - DOE Handbook Reopening (A note from superintendent) 

21:45 - What is the role of the DOH when there is a suspected case? What happens when that case becomes a cluster?

22:50 - Hypothetical scenario: A positive case (student) 

26:25 - Random testing from the DOH of educators? Is there any value

28:00 - 3ft vs 6ft physical distancing and wearing a mask inside a classroom (pt 2)

— Q & A Portion — 

30:20 - Will there be a hotline?

32:45 - Tips for after school (Maintaining that bubble) 

33:30 - Tips for after school (Secondary Ed students) 

34:30 - Face Shields vs Masks

36:00 - Parents picking up dropping off (Wearing a mask)

36:45 - Temperature checks for students, advocation for health checks (symptoms)

39:15 - Written guidance

40:00 - Students eating in classrooms vs the cafeteria (Physical Distancing)

42:00 - Should students wear a face shield during recess when play space is limited?

43:45 - Will there be DOH guidance and training for all schools regarding school opening?

45:20 - Will there be DOH guidance for isolation areas, do these areas need to be staffed by a nurse?

46:35 - Are oscillating fans ok in the classroom?

48:22 - Water fountain usage

52:40 - Mention of DOE Return to learn guidance PDF by superintendent, will address food service and transportation

54:40 - Should parents be allowed on campus to pick up and drop off students? 

56:00 - Covid testing (Specifically Mainland teachers)